Becoming Buddhist

Attempting to Live a More Mindful Life

Angsty Pants

4 Comments

The Buddha taught that there are Four Noble Truths:

1. There is suffering (dukkha).

2. Attachment causes suffering.

3. Suffering can end.

4. There is a path to end suffering.

What’s the path? You guessed it: meditation and mindful practice.

It’s a rainy morning in Northern California and I am ruminating on my daily dukkha. Funny, because if you’d seen a movie of my life yesterday you might have suspected that the greatest dukkha was either a) the awkward five minutes when I attempted to hook up the bicycle trailer to my bike, in the dark, after preschool—with Lex trying to be helpful (some kinds of help are the kind of help we all can do without…)—and then dropped one of the critical safety bolts in a pile of wet leaves (and remember, it was dark). At this point, Lex really started to be extra helpful by shouting “it must be in the leaves, Mama! In the leaves! How come you dropped it, Mama? Huh?”

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERAor b) the moment when, having survived the bike trailer incident and a slightly harrowing ride to my favorite happy hour joint where I was meeting my dear friend Katie, Lex lost it in the restaurant. One minute he was happily eating a taco and chips, chatting away, and the next he was howling, big fat tears running down his face. You see, I’d eaten a bite of a chip he’d declared ruined because it had broken (silly me for thinking it a discard). He howled so much that half the restaurant turned to stare and the host came over to inquire whether there was anything she could do. I’m sure Katie was appreciating her birth control pill in that moment. He howled so much that a woman at another table, sitting with a child who was probably ten, came over to tell me “it does get easier, you know.” I found her concern very touching.

But oddly, while both of those moments, well, sucked—I didn’t hold onto them yesterday. No; the much greater dukkha for me was nothing you’d see in a movie; it was going on in my head.

My greatest dukkha is angst.

I suppose one might call all dukkha angst, and all angst dukkha, and maybe that would be right. So perhaps I should say that angst is my biggest challenge. And lately, some days I just wake up angsty. I am angsty about my writing, which I feel I am not doing enough of; I am angsty about being 39 and not pregnant; I am angsty about money, perpetually; and then I am angsty about my career more generally. Then I am angsty about this mindfulness project, for not meditating enough, not studying enough, and/or for wasting time with mindfulness when I should be getting published and becoming famous. Oh yes, it’s a hamster wheel. And for me, the wheel feels all too real most days. I honestly, after an angsty hour, will come to the conclusion that yes, I am wasting time with mindfulness because I should do a better job of juggling work, parenting, writing, publishing, being Martha Stewart, blogging, finishing all my Christmas shopping in a timely manner, exercising, putting out, getting pregnant, and—oh yeah—nurturing a budding music career.

I was tossing all of this around on BART yesterday when I read this passage in Buddhism for Mothers:

As mothers we discover life is no light experience. We have responsibilities; pitiable amounts of time to ourselves; desperate worries about whether our children are healthy, ‘normal,’ and able to meet the expectations of the judgmental world around them. We suffer guilt that we’re not attending to the hundred other things we could be doing. We agonize over our careers and, in many cases, the loss thereof. In our darker moments we may struggle with self-esteem as we watch the worry lines set in and our body parts begin to point down (5).

And I began to tear up.

What can I say? The angst didn’t all dissolve, but I did start to wonder whether all those negative thoughts are what Buddhism refers to as illusion.

On this rainy morning in California, I am thinking about angst. And I am thinking about mothers. And I want to shout out to the mother at my son’s preschool who is a single mom with no car and all kinds of other logistical challenges. She was crying this morning when I dropped off Lex. I am sending loving kindness her way, though she may never know it’s coming.

Thanks for reading this long and somewhat rambling post.

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Author: becomingbuddhist

I am a writer, teacher, and mother living in Northern California. Recently I decided to try an experiment in living more mindfully. This blog is my testimonial.

4 thoughts on “Angsty Pants

  1. I have found (and tried to write about) that parenthood is such an amazing lens on practice…or really, that as parents, it IS our practice. Thanks for the story – be well.

  2. I claim to know ZERO about Buddhism but when I do read about it it always resonates with me to the point that I wonder if I’m kind of an accidental beginning buddhist or something. Thanks to this project, I may be starting to understand why. I think that there are a few parallels between Buddhist practice and the slow lifestyle, the principal one being that they both require that you let go of attachment. This:

    I am angsty about my writing, which I feel I am not doing enough of; I am angsty about being 39 and not pregnant; I am angsty about money, perpetually; and then I am angsty about my career more generally. Then I am angsty about this mindfulness project, for not meditating enough, not studying enough, and/or for wasting time with mindfulness when I should be getting published and becoming famous. Oh yes, it’s a hamster wheel. And for me, the wheel feels all too real most days. I honestly, after an angsty hour, will come to the conclusion that yes, I am wasting time with mindfulness because I should do a better job of juggling work, parenting, writing, publishing, being Martha Stewart, blogging, finishing all my Christmas shopping in a timely manner, exercising, putting out, getting pregnant, and—oh yeah—nurturing a budding music career.

    made my head spin! DUDE!! I imagine that even the least buddhist among us would find all of those desires to be too much muchness. I have no idea how the hell you go about culling that shit but I’m guessing that would be a pretty fruitful endeavor. I know in my experience it’s been all about focusing on those few things in my life that really bring it *meaning*, which is to say that this it is a very personal journey indeed but I think that if you can swing it successfully you begin to see that there is a kind of real satisfaction in recognizing all of the potentially great things that you are NOT pursuing.

    • I hear you, slowmamma. At the same time, part of this project is figuring out how to keep in my life the many things that do have meaning for me (and there are many). How does one juggle being passionate and ambitious with letting go of expectation and attachment? That’s one of the things I’m trying to figure out.

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